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Posts Tagged ‘paint colors’

2008: We buy a house with jungle print wallpaper and tan fixtures in the upstairs extension master bathroom
2009: We prioritize other rooms because they were more public
2010: We prioritize other rooms because they were original to the house
2011: We prioritize other rooms because they were more fun
2012: We prioritize other things because we had a baby
2013: And another baby
2014: We have two babies, probably not a lot is getting done around here
2015: I mean making additional messes? On purpose?
2016: New roof needed, necessitating a new skylight… which got me thinking about that bathroom…

So, while my husband was in the Mediterranean doing a study abroad class for 3 weeks, and we still had a few weeks of full time childcare after our semester ended but just before the public school year did, it seemed like the time had finally come, so I decided to tackle the jungle bathroom.

My two biggest priorities:

1. Say goodbye to the loud jungle wallpaper on the ceiling and in the skylight and closet and everywhere.

2. Try to make the “sand”-colored toilet, bidet, sink, and tile seem lighter by using a dark wall color.

Now, I know that leaf print / botanical wallpaper is very “pinnable” and cute:

Screen Shot 2017-09-02 at 1.22.38 PM.png

And some people might argue (with good reason) that it is a great style. I usually love florals and leaves in fabrics, clothing, textiles, art, and jewelry design. But even though I love Blanche Devereaux:

blanch+golden+globes

After 8 years of staring at it, I felt sure this stuff had to go:

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Please note that this wallpaper continued ON TO THE CEILING and was even wrapped up IN TO THE TUBE connecting the skylight to the ceiling.  And the adjoining closet ceiling, too. I mean you have to admire the DETERMINATION involved.

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Peeling begins. The top vinyl layer came off in fairly large chunks, just by picking up a corner and carefully peeling.

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My trusty Wagner steamer helped with removing the under layer — the soft peach paper layer that was actually glued to the walls.

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Sorry about the wide range of light levels — these were taken over the course of several different days.

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Steaming the under layer briefly led to loosening. Notice you can see the leaf print even on the underlayer because it had aged differently where more and less sunlight got through to it.

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Carpet up, more wallpaper peeled… hi there skylight. Note the wallpaper going on into the closet ceiling as well.

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This was while roofers had the skylight covered with plastic before they took it out — it really made the room much darker and made me appreciate that the skylight exists.

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The ceiling was very slow going — I think they must have used some stronger adhesive up here, probably because wallpaper on a bathroom ceiling is a tough job!

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These small areas were hard as the steamer could not fit into them. Hot water in a handheld spray bottle seemed to work.

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Skylight peeling in progress. There was some rubbery glue in here that was VERY hard to get off — I think it may have been contact cement.

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Jesus is that you? (Nope, just skylight replacement day!)

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New skylight in place for the rain.

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Now about the rest of that ceiling… (And yes, we have a crazy old Victorian style toilet with an elevated tank, who knows why? I will say it has never clogged in 9 years due to its enormous flush-power, so maybe that is why.)

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For some reason this back wall was much harder to get right. Slower going than any of the other walls. There truly is a lot of variety in how wallpaper removes, and that is one reason why I will probably never hang it on purpose in any area of my home. It’s just too much of a hassle to get rid of it and make a change.

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Progress!

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Steaming inside the skylight was weird, it sort of formed a little cloud.

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More small areas needing attention.

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I had read that it is good to use tinted primer before a very dark color. Since we were doing the walls in a very dark blue: Valspar Indigo Streamer, I decided to try it out. Lowe’s paint department agreeably added some black pigment to a gallon of Kilz2 primer I purchased.

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It already looked a lot better!

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First sample pot of Indigo Streamer on the walls.

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One coat down, one to go. This was to try to make that “sand” tone tile look lighter… I felt excited it was starting to work as an optical illusion.

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So no, this is not a white sink, but it does look lighter to me.

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Toilet, bidet, sink against the Indigo Streamer walls.

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Rehung some old IKEA curtains over that giant glass window outside the shower for some privacy (there had been vertical blinds but they were very old and not clean enough to save).

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I found this image in a 1935 American Standard plumbing catalog online and loved it — now it’s framed in our bathroom! 🙂

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Trying to choose some vinyl flooring. We went with vinyl because it was cheaper and we have long term plans to properly redo this bathroom with a soaker tub and new fixtures, so we didn’t want to over-invest in it as is.

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Stick on tile floors! We chose a groutable vinyl tile to make it look a little more like ceramic.

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Tile progress.

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Tile through the adjoining closet — this had been plywood for a couple of YEARS since we had pulled up the carpets for hygiene reasons (Carpet in the bathroom, another thing I will never do intentionally after having dealt with it twice in this house)

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Some after pics! I stuck a frame from MirrorMate over the builder mirror to make things look a little more finished. It was a quick and easy install, as promised! I chose a chunky style I liked from their discounted options, and spray-painted it with oil rubbed bronze Rustoleum to match the frames and clock.

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After. It’s still an odd little space (hi, Victorian toilet and bidet!) but at least it’s a lot less junglesome now. All of the trim and the ceiling is painted in Valspar Light Raffia to match the tile and help it read as lighter/whiter.

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Closet ceiling WITHOUT WALLPAPER! Now painted Valspar Light Raffia.

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View from the bathroom into the closet.

I’ll finish with a few before-and-after comparisons just for fun.

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The floor was Armstrong Crescendo peel-and-stick vinyl 12×12 groutable tile in French Gray. It was $1.08 per tile which was convenient, since we were able to overbuy, save the receipt, and then return the tiles we didn’t use. Link to its current listing at Lowes here. We used a grout color called “Mocha” again to avoid bright whites that would make the fixtures look dark.

So that was our rumble in the jungle! I’m so glad it’s over!

(And yes, it took me over a year to get around to posting this! We’re currently working on the downstairs hallway which had pink grasscloth and pale yellow paint on all the built in bookcases… hopefully I can update sooner when that’s complete.)

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When we bought this house back in 2008, the exterior color – especially the dark trim color – was definitely a negative. Everyone says you have to learn as a prospective buyer to “look past” the paint colors, and everyone is pretty much right. Here’s what it looked like way back then, on our very first visit.

Mostly pretty dark grey

In some lights (this was a warm sunset time of day) more brown?

The paint wasn’t in great shape at that point, though it was mostly fine, but then we bought it and moved in and did other things and all of a sudden five years and five winters happened, which of course deteriorated it further:

By this point though, we had finally saved up enough to start getting estimates from local painters. We had 3 different people come out who were recommended by neighbors, friends, and the owner of our local Benjamin Moore paint store. We preferred having a single person or small company do the work rather than a bigger crew, even though it would take longer. In the end, we didn’t choose the lowest estimate, but we chose the person who seemed the most interested in our house, the one who took the most photos, had the most ideas, and wrote up the most detailed estimate. He really seemed to care about the house, and getting things right. When the project is all completed, I’m hopeful we’ll feel we made the right choice. I certainly feel that way so far.

So the first step was deciding on colors. We enjoyed playing for a long time with the Benjamin Moore Personal Color Viewer online, which lets you preview different colors on your actual photos of your home. After a few days of flinking around there, we had a few top contenders, but of course you can’t know for sure until you see a few painted on your actual house, with your texture, your light situation, etc. Still it was fun and gave us some ideas.

Mostly it gave me the idea that white trim was going to make a big, big difference.

Admittedly, these are a little cartoony. (Especially note how I sort of “invented” a front right pillar there in front of our bushes, but then left the back pillar half hidden.) Oh well! It gave us somewhere to start.

And start we did. Time to get some paint on these walls!

And time to start writing checks. Unlike Home Depot or Lowe’s, it seems like the more professional paint retailers (in our town, this is limited to Benjamin Moore and Sherwin Williams) don’t mix you up those charming $3 small sample pots of paint. I’m sure they have great reasons, but it was kind of a bummer for my tightwad soul to have to pay for a whole quart of paint ($20+) in each color we wanted to preview. It definitely made us more disciplined about narrowing down our choices somewhat, although of course in terms of the larger house project, the price of an extra sample quart or two would end up seeming pretty small. Good first lesson in the process. 🙂

A few weird things we felt we had to factor in to our color decision:

  • The stucco texture on our house is very lumpy and shows a lot of contrast between the high and low spots because it gets full sun for most of the day. We didn’t want too light of a color because we felt it made the contrast even more noticeable.
  • Stucco, especially textured stucco, seems to look best (or least weird we think) when it’s painted some type of earth tone. We didn’t want it to completely blend in with green grass, or brown mulch, or tan/grey winter-dead-landscaping around it, but we also felt like some of the more “fun” colors we were attracted to (especially blues and greys) looked like they weren’t right for stucco. Sad but true.
  • The houses on either side of us are lighter — the one on the left is white smooth stucco with red wood trim and the one on the right is a cream-color siding with white trim. So if we went a bit darker with our color (and white with the trim) it seemed like it would be a nice counterpoint to the neighbors’ house, rather than going very pale and having 3 very pale houses in a row.

In the end when we saw them on the house, the decision wasn’t hard.

Pismo Dunes was too pale – it looked almost exactly like the previous color!

It also “washed out” too much next to the white trim, especially in the places the house gets more sun (this photo was taken under the porch roof’s shade.

Kingsport Grey was promising, but seemed just slightly TOO grey, and we wanted to be careful not to let our stucco start to read as “lumpy drips of concrete” instead. Caldwell Green was fun and I actually loved the idea of it next to crisp white trim, but unfortunately the color change from our previous tan/pink to Caldwell Green would have required 2 coats of paint to cover adequately, where all the other colors we chose could do it in one coat. Doubling the paint budget went RIGHT out, especially because the color seemed just a tiny bit too bold in person anyway, to us.

So in the end, the winner for our exterior stucco color was Mesa Verde Tan (AC-33), which had the nice midtone color intensity of the Kingsport Grey but with a warmer, browner tone to it. I had thought it might be too dark, but especially in bright sun it really seemed like a nice happy medium. And it’s definitely dark ENOUGH to make the new white trim, which is actually Benjamin Moore Bavarian Cream (OC-123), stand out bright and clean and hog all the attention, which is kind of what I think it has always wanted to do.

What do you think? 🙂

It’s not done yet, but the front is getting toward being done, and we are definitely excited about how it is looking so far.

Other colors involved: Porch floor is the Ben Moore premixed porch and floor paint in Rich Brown, though we may still want to go greyer for the second coat it needs anyway, and the porch ceiling – in a small nod to the “haint blue” of beautiful Southern porches I have loved on our travels, is Benjamin Moore Blue Hydrangea (2062-60).

It’s amazing how much brighter things feel — even just from having a lighter porch ceiling the front rooms get more reflected light during the day.

More updates soon as we finalize front door decisions! I can hardly wait for a true “before and after” this time, believe me.

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